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Here are some photos from Morgan's personal collection she wanted to share with all of you.  Continue to check back as we periodically update with different photos.

 

Morgan with a New Friend at the
Kansas City Zoo

 

Morgan with host Dave Hall of
Better Kansas City

 

Morgan with Mark Leibovich, who wrote This Town
 and writes for the NY Times Magazine

 

Morgan doing an interview with Steve Kraske at the
Kansas City NPR station promoting
Murder Among Friends



 

Morgan and Betty Davis on Hotel
(Sept. 21, 1983)

 

ComicCon 2011
with Ernie Borgnine, Tippi Hedren and Cassandra Peterson

Morgan with Davyd Whaley
at the Peninsula March 31, 2012

 

Morgan with Norman Buckley and Davyd Whaley
at the Peninsula March 31, 2012


 

Morgan with
Jackie Martling (Jackie the Jokeman from Howard Stern Show)
and his girlfriend, Emily Conners



Montblanc Brunch at Hotel Bel-Air
Feb. 25, 2012

 

At Desert AIDS Project Fundraiser
Feb. 11, 2012

Show featured Queen Latifah, Wynonna Judd, Megan Mullally and David Burnham. 
Awards went to Peter Gallagher and Matt Bomer

 

Morgan being interviewed before the show Morgan with Matt Bomer of USA's WHITE COLLAR

Morgan before the show Morgan with Richard Schiff of NBC's WEST WING
  Morgan with actresses Lindsay Wagner and Donna Mills

 

Women's Huild of Cedars Sinai Luncheon
April, 2011

 

Chagoury Couture at Britweek
Art Show of Sasha Newley

(son of Joan Collins and Anthony Newley)
May 8, 2010

(photo credit: Giulio Marcocchi)


(on the red carpet)


(with Elisabeth Rohm and George Blodwell)


Keep California Green
May 2, 2010


In support of environmental group, Keep California Green, at Paul Haggis's (Crash) house.

 


With Gov. Ed Rendell of Pennsylvania at a Democratic fundraiser in Philadelphia on March 8, 2010.

 

Morgan arrives on the red carpet at "The Perfect Game"
premiere held at the Pacific Theatres at The Grove on April 5, 2010 in Los Angeles, California.
 

From time to time, Morgan enjoys meeting with fans at select autograph events.
The pictures below are from a show at the Rosemont Hotel in Chicago, Il on March 13, 2010.

 


Times Columnist Philip Potempa
 


With Barry Corbin


With Karen Cadle, Richard Chamberlain, George Kennedy and Ernie Hudson

 

 

 


Morgan with her sister Cathryn and her two dogs,
Booh (standard white poodle) and Atticus



Sherry Lansing Receives
Patron of Arts Award


(JoBeth Williams, Kate Edelman Johnson, Sherry Lansing,
Jim Casey, Linda Gray and Morgan)


Shawn Baldwin from CMG at the 12th Annual Milken Institute Global Conference


From left to right is Michael Milken, Paul Pelosi of NASA
(son of Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi), Brandon Wilson of Proteus Energy
(son of Petrohawk Chairman, Oil Legend Floyd Wilson),
Morgan Fairchild, Actress and Activist (a very sharp intellect!),
Goldman Sachs International Vice Chairman Robert Hormats and Shawn Baldwin from CMG.


Park Conservancy Luncheon on May 7, New York City.
Benefiting a group that raises money to preserve and restore Central Park 
 

   

 


Texas Film Hall of Fame Awards
 Austin, Texas March 7, 2008


Connie Nelson, Morgan and Tess Harper,
who presented Morgan's award


Tom Rogers, Morgan, Morgan's cousin Lavonne Rogers and
 Mariska Hargitay, who was accepting posthumously
for her mother, Jayne Mansfield
(Lavonne went to high school with Jayne Mansfield)


Morgan with ZZ Top's Dusty Hill, whom
Morgan has known she was was 15


Connie Nelson, Tess Harper, Ben Barnes,
Morgan and Greg Johnson

 


 


 



 

Morgan with Steve Tate at the
2007 White House Correspondent's Ball

 


 

Morgan with Cathy and Tom DeLay at Fox News

 

Morgan with Cathy and Ariana Huffington
Backstage at Hannity & Colmes 10th Anniversary Fox News in Dallas, TX

 


 

Morgan with Martha Raddatz and Gen. Casey, who ran the Iraq war until recently.

 

Under Fire
A gripping tale of an American platoon pinned down in a Baghdad slum
Sunday, March 25, 2007; BW03
Washington Post
by Andrew Carroll

THE LONG ROAD HOME
A Story of War and Family
By Martha Raddatz

The timing is hardly ideal for yet another Iraq book. Americans are burned out on the war not just politically but aesthetically. After a wave of books, articles, news reports, documentaries and blogs, Iraq has become a tired, repetitive story with no happy ending in sight. So why hand over $24.95 for one more war story? Because, as it turns out, Martha Raddatz's The Long Road Home is a masterpiece of literary nonfiction that rivals any war-related classic that has preceded it.

The chief White House correspondent for ABC News, Raddatz was in Baghdad when she learned about a platoon of 1st Cavalry Division soldiers who had embarked in April 2004 on what they thought would be a routine community-outreach mission (they were assisting with sewage disposal, to put it delicately) in the massive Shiite slum of Sadr City. Without warning, the once pro-U.S., Saddam Hussein-hating enclave erupted into an anti-American shooting gallery. The 1st Cav platoon was pinned down by members of the firebrand cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's Shiite militia, the Mahdi Army -- hundreds of them. The Long Road Home details the increasingly desperate and unquestionably heroic attempts to save the troops and reclaim order in an impoverished district that's home to some 2.5 million Iraqis. There isn't a hint of political bias in the book, but by focusing on this pivotal firefight, Raddatz illuminates a key moment when Iraq's sectarian strife mutated into the ferocious, unrelenting insurgency it is now.

Fraught with life-and-death drama as combat intrinsically is, writing a compelling war story is actually quite difficult. The challenge is to capture the kaleidoscopic chaos of battle, keep the reader oriented and humanize the soldiers caught in the maelstrom. Raddatz does all of this impeccably well. The Long Road Home moves at a breathless pace, vividly conveying the suffocating terror of being surrounded in a maze of city streets by an enemy that is seemingly everywhere and nowhere at once.

Raddatz doesn't flinch at depicting the carnage of war; the book contains descriptions of violence so graphic they are literally gasp-inducing, but the bloodshed is not gratuitous. At one harrowing point, Raddatz relates how a young soldier was shot in the head with such force that the round slammed through his Kevlar helmet and ricocheted several times through his skull. The soldier, a devout Christian and Humvee mechanic named Casey who volunteered to help the trapped platoon, also happened to be Cindy Sheehan's son.

What distinguishes The Long Road Home from other war books is that Raddatz seamlessly shifts from the troops in the crossfire to the anxious souls who stand watch over the loneliest post in any conflict: the spouses, parents and children on the home front. (Cindy Sheehan makes a relatively brief appearance as Casey's grieving mother, but the future antiwar activist is hardly a central character.) Far from interrupting the flow of the story, the profiles of the loved ones back in the States give us a richer understanding of the soldiers in Iraq and infuse the narrative with greater tension.

Stephen "Dusty" Hiller, a 25-year-old specialist, had recently learned that his wife was pregnant with their first son. The night after he charged into Sadr City with one of the lead rescue teams, the doorbell rang at his home back in Fort Hood, Tex. His wife, Lesley, went to answer it, and the exchange that followed is as gut-wrenching as any battle account:

"She opened the door and saw an army chaplain. Another officer in uniform was with him. There wasn't a chance for either visitor to say a word.

" 'No!' Lesley yelled. She was frantic, panic-stricken. 'You all got the wrong house!'

"She slammed the door.

"The officers stayed outside and began calling her name softly.

"After a moment she opened the door a crack.

" 'Are you Mrs. Hiller?' one of them asked.

"She shook her head. 'You have the wrong house,' she insisted.

" 'Is your name Lesley?'

" 'No,' she said again. 'You got the wrong house!' Then she started to scream."

This is storytelling pared down to its essentials. To her great credit, Raddatz knows when a scene is potent enough to get out of the way and let it unfold without heavy-handed embellishment.

Which is not to suggest that Raddatz is simply a stenographer here, mechanically recording an inherently riveting story. Whether it's the image of an Iraqi family casually waving at a passing convoy of American troops dodging a torrent of bullets or a lone soldier drawn to the sight of a sparrow "arcing low and untouched beneath the gunfire," Raddatz provides arresting and lyrical moments throughout the book that are clearly the result of a reporter's meticulous research and a poet's eye for detail.

One hopes that The Long Road Home will further spotlight the sacrifices made by U.S. troops and their families. But this book should not be read out of a sense of obligation to these men and women, and it won't succeed merely because of Raddatz's prominence. No, this is a book that will last, and it will do so for the same reason that any great work endures -- because, through the strength and grace of its prose, it pulls us into a world that is simultaneously foreign and familiar and makes us care about the individuals who inhabit this place long after we have closed the covers. And because, one by one, we will pass the book along to others with the only words of praise that really matter: "Here, you've got to read this." ?

Martha Raddatz is a good friend of Morgan's and Morgan thought you would be interested in these photos and review of Martha's book.  For more information about the book, click on the book.

(from left to right) Martha Raddatz (ABC News), Jason Alexander,
Tony "Teabag" Bancroft, Morgan and Chris "Burner" Baird. 
Tony and Chris are USMC officers and F-18 Hornet pilots
based in Miramar, Ca.  These were taken after Martha had just done Bill
Maher's show promoting her new book on Iraq, "The Long Road Home",
which has gotten rave reviews! 

 

Homage to James Brown

An American legend died this week.  He was a man who had a profound effect upon me and my career, in a strange way, and I felt his passing could not be un-remarked upon by me.  Many an homage and memorial will be written and shown, but I just wanted to share with my friends and fans a bit about my feelings about the Hardest Working Man in Show Business – James Brown.

I first saw him live in ’64 and it changed my life as a performer.  I first met him in ’74 when I was doing Search for Tomorrow at CBS in NY and he had just finished an interview and we met at the elevator.  He told me he was my biggest fan!!  I found out over the years how many musicians and club performers


This picture was taken in Dec. of ’04 when I was touring with The Graduate and we were playing Saskatoon (I kid you not!).  Great town for theater!  But COLD!!!

watched daytime soap operas!!  (Sammy Davis, Lena Horn, Carol Burnett!!  Who knew?)  I ran into him lots over the years and he would always send someone out to the audience to get me to come backstage or to the green room when he found out I was out there – sometimes even sending the current wife out to get me.  Always so gracious and kind to me and whoever I was with.

Anyway, I walked into the theater one night and saw on the bulletin board that James was playing in town.  It turned out one of our local security guys was working at that other auditorium that night, so I asked to get him on his cell phone and then asked him to get me James’s road manager.  We started our show early in Canada because it got dark so early and I figured we’d get out early enough to catch the tail end of James’s show.  He said to come on over and that I could bring the cast and they would get everyone in.  Well, we arrived and they got us in the stage door and took us right over to the edge of the stage, and my cast was in heaven – in the wings at a James Brown concert, with the go-go girls running on and off!!

Then they let him know I was there and he insisted I come out so he could introduce me to the audience – and we ended up finishing the show together and dancing our asses off – as you can see from the picture!  When we walked offstage together, before anyone else was around, he told me very quietly that he’d just been diagnosed with prostate cancer, but that he thought they’d caught it in time.  We had a serious conversation walking back to his dressing room and then my cast arrived.

He was so gracious to all of them – invited everyone into the room and signed autographs for them and talked for 30 minutes.  I remember the young man playing my Benjamin (the Dustin Hoffman part) saying, “I’ll never wash this hand again, after shaking hands with James Brown”.  That young man was Rob Corrdry’s brother, Nate, and he is now on Studio 60. 

James was truly one of a kind!  And he and Rudolf Nureyev and Bruce Lee are who taught me everything I know about stage presence and focus of energy.  James and Rudy were the two most fascinating and feral things I ever saw on a stage. I set out to analyze and copy everything they ever did – as did many aspiring performers, and I think about them every time I get set to walk on a stage or soundstage.  How would they hold this audience?

How lucky I was to see him when I was a kid in ’64, when he was new and so amazing (and before everyone else had copied all his moves), before he had the really big crossover hits that most people know now – and when I was the only kid I knew who knew who he was or had a copy of Live at the Apollo!

How lucky generations of musicians and performers are that a man that inventive and innovative and raw and alive came along and changed music forever.  And changed some of our lives, too.

I was very lucky to know him.  May he rest in peace.

 

Morgan arriving at the 2006 Emmy Awards

 

Morgan, with Jim Belushi, while working on the
animated pilot, Lolo's Cafe


Morgan attending the 2006 White House Correspondent's Ball

 

Morgan attending the 2005 White House Correspondent's Ball

Sean Astin, Morgan, Steve Doocy of
Fox and Friends on Fox News

Congressman Adam Schiff, Morgan, Juliet Huddy
(Fox News), waiter and former Ambassador
to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg

Morgan with Rick Kaplan, head of MSNBC

Morgan with Senator Joe Biden and June Lockhart

Morgan with Marc Ginsberg

Jocelyn Colmes (Alan's wife), Alan Colmes
(Hannity and Colmes on Fox News) and Morgan

Morgan and Sean Astin

 

That 70s Show

Morgan on the set of THAT 70s SHOW

 

 

Recently, Morgan attended a symposium in Galveston, TX on emerging viruses.  The above is a photo of Morgan listening to Dr. Peter Jahrling from USAMRIID, one of the foremost specialists on smallpox in the world.  Morgan was very interested in the presentations on the latest research on smallpox, ebola, west nile, sars and influenza.

 

On the set of the WB show 7th Heaven

 

Happy Birthday Morgan!!!

 

Morgan at home with Mr. Snuggles
In Memoriam (6/28/04)

 

At the Cinegrill to see Morgan's assistant, Andrea, perform

 

On the set of FRIENDS


 

Morgan with George (Dec. 17, 1921 to May 9, 2004) and 
Irene Lessis (Nov. 13, 1919 to January 13, 2004)
taken at Marion's Pizza in Dayton Ohio sometime in June, 1983.

 

I once had the great pleasure of meeting you while you were filming "Time
Bomb" in Sanger, Texas.  I have always enjoyed your work and while looking
at some old photo's, I came across this one.  From your website photos you
haven't changed a bit.  Keep making those films and TV shows.  I am still in
Law Enforcement, hope to retire soon.  Thanks for the great pleasure
of meeting you and the courtesy you showed to everyone.
You were so personable to all involved and the public. 

 


Welcome Biography Film Credits What's New
Photos   Activism Store
FanSource Q & A Links Contact
Fashion House But Can They Sing? Political Background The Graduate